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Photojournalist Salary

If you are thinking about a photojournalism path, then you’re probably chasing after what inspires you. A lot of people will supplement their income with commercial jobs, and they will do side work, and perhaps sell their photographs to stock agencies. For instance, you may choose to do school or family portraits. It’s critical to start developing a good portfolio or a web blog to show off your most awesome work and then use some social media outlets to help get the word out about your stuff.

The starting salary for photojournalists at the entry-level is about $21,000 each year. That’s not great, but it is what it is. You can earn opportunities for advancement with training, education, diligence, and hard work. The Internet has created a brand new world for a photojournalist that is thinking of expanding their career. They can really take everything to a whole new level.

More than 50% of adults are getting their information online or from a portable gadget like a tablet or smartphone, and it’s important that the photojournalist of today has the skills and know-how to work in an Internet environment. Getting a photojournalism degree and taking courses in web design or digital photography, as well as Photoshop and other editing courses, is a good idea. Taking courses on getting your photographs published, as well as your content, will be useful, and it will help you be certain that you have what it takes to succeed in the world of today. Start by getting information journalism schools on the Internet.

More Photojournalist Salary Information

Education

A lot of publications will want to see a Bachelor’s degree in photojournalism. The training and skills offered in a program like that will open you up to the workforce in a way that experience just can’t get to. Even a photojournalism minor, or one in a related area, is sometimes recommended. Freelance, or self-employed, photojournalists need to think about entrepreneurship and business courses too. A journalist who’s self-employed needs to do coursework to comprehend journalism law and copyright laws so that they can keep themselves guarded from libel.

Experience

It’s crucial for new photojournalists to start developing a portfolio. Take photographs every day, wherever you go, and publish them whenever you can. Volunteer to snap photographs at events near you, or around your local community, and then publish your photos on the Internet. You might also want to offer them to a local newspaper as well. You might not get paid anything, but you’ll certainly get published. You’ll also need to get feedback from the audience for your photographs. You have to be really passionate about the work you’re doing, and you have to know that a good photojournalist is always looking to improve.

Market

Midsize or small markets usually pay less, but they’re sometimes necessary for a photojournalist who is just getting out of college. It can be very hard to get a job at a major publication, or in a big city, but if you start out in a small way, you can then use that experience to help build up your resume.

Technical Expertise

In order to be competitive in a field that you’re after, you have to have a skill set that really makes you look unique from the rest of the guys out there. Look into education in digital photography and print, and look into video and audio as well. It’s sometimes not enough for a photojournalist to take really good photographs. The major news publications sometimes require copy or captions to accompany their photographs, and a lot of them will want to have some video clips to go on their sites too. Learn every single type of media. The skills to publish, edit, write, and work in a lot of different media will definitely help when you’re out searching for some employment.